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Posts tagged with ‘Customer reviews’

The secret to high rate of customers retention

Customer retentionIt took me a few years to realize that happiness is based on one’s ability to manage expectations. We experience happiness when our expectations are exceeded. We may experience content and satisfaction when our expectations are met, or nearly met.  A disappointment is not an experience most people like to reiterate. Regardless of our age, gender, education or social status we all have expectations. Nobody ever enters into any business or social transaction without having an expectation of outcome.

Expectations are formed by multitude of our own experiences, experiences of people we know and by marketing messaging. A price of transaction or fleeing nature of social interaction may reduce an importance of meeting our expectations, but the repeat experience of being disappointed will most definitely change our willingness to try once again. Even when you buy on a whim a $0.25 lollypop packaged in orange colored wrap at a gas station, you will be disappointed if you experience a strawberry flavor in your mouth. This experience may not make you very unhappy, and may not cause you to drive a few extra miles next time you need gas – the first time that happen. However, it may start to erode your trust in the establishment and to question its ability to deliver quality customer experience. Here are some examples:

  • My sailing friend mentioned to me a few times about great experiences he had at the Dirty Cello I purchased tickets for the next one only to be bored by pompous “community” messages and the opening act that have lasted for over an hour, before the performance we paid for started. I noticed a few customers living in disgust.
  • After watching Ford Fusion commercials about their terrific fuel economy I went to a considerable effort to secure one for my last trip rental. While it is certainly a nice car, the fuel economy is nowhere near commercial’s claims. There is no doubt my next car will not be a Ford.

From a company’s perspective it is imperative to have a clear understanding of its “best” customers’ expectations. I placed the word best in quotes because there are multiple ways to differentiate your customer base. One company may consider their most profitable customers “best” and optimize its products and processes to meet or exceed expectations of these customers without sacrificing profit margins. Another company may see those who’s feedback indicate the best fit, between their expectations and the experience the company delivers, to be their “best” customers. Such company may decide to optimize their products and processes to leverage their “best” customers’ enthusiasm to increase its market share and its share of their valet.

The point is – you cannot expect to retain your customers if you fail to deliver what the customers expect.

Cheap Gas, Electric Cars and Customer Experience

Cheap gasEven if you sell a commodity, customer experience often outweighs price considerations. Just because the term Customer Experience Management (CEM) is  relatively new to corporate vocabulary, the power of “experience” is not lost on marketing professionals. The world of marketing is drastically changing, moving away from the hype of novelty and awareness-building through branding and advertising, towards  the creation of loyalty through great customer experiences.

 

As oil prices impact every element of the world economy, and markets expect the depressed levels to last for at least a decade, the future of alternative energy technologies being questioned. The sales of electric and hybrid cars  are dipping, seemingly in concert with oil prices, and auto industry analysts are trying to assess whether or not cheap gas will kill the demand for such vehicles.

It is important to remember that even at the near-record high of gas price, customer retention of hybrid vehicles was only 35%. Specifically Prius owners’ loyalty in 2012 was only 25%.

“Only 30.9% of hybrid drivers traded in for another gas-electric model in the third quarter of 2011, when gas prices were stable. But as prices at the pump surged in the final three months of that year, so did hybrid car repurchases, leading to a 40.1% loyalty rate.”

It is easy to see correlations between gas prices and sales of electric vehicles, but perhaps it is a mistake to take these as the causation.

It is true that sales of electric cars from Nissan (Leaf) are 20% down this year and gas-electric hybrid Chevy Volt’s are down 50%. However, the demand for Tesla Model S is stronger than ever and sales are up 35% during the first quarter of 2015.

Mining online reviews posted by customers, who have purchased these cars, reveal a much stronger correlation between customer experience and retention/loyalty than the correlation between sales of electric cars and price of gas. As the novelty of electric/hybrid cars and the social cache of environmentalism fade, the underwhelming customer experience these vehicles delivered to their owners, compels customers to return back to familiar, fossil fuel vehicles. That will continue until the electric cars sold provide better customer experience than conventional ones at the same or better price. The energy, that drives these cars, may be alternative, but it is not a substitute for the delivery of superior customer experience.

Customer Experience – From Data to Action

Customer Experience-From Data to ActionToo many analytical efforts focus on a single stream/source of data and that makes them unproductive. The purpose of analysis is the development of actionable intelligence:

  • to lower the uncertainty of management action
  • and/or to help form ideas to bridge the gap between the existing and desired state of affairs.

Confining these efforts to the analysis of a single source of data does not provide enough intelligence to produce confident outcomes.

Google Analytics is a good example of an excellent tool that provides a great deal of transactional data that requires interpretation to suggest an action. When the interpreters have no data about the customers’ experience with the website, they would have to make assumptions about the motivations behind the transactional data. Every time an assumption substitutes for  data,  the confidence in a suggested action is diminished. I am not arguing for “paralysis thru analysis”, but there is a reason why GPS requires the minimum of three satellite signals, before it gives your position’s coordinates.

I used to look over Yelp reviews before selecting a new restaurant to check out, but 9 out of ten times my experience fell well below the expectations created by other customers’ perceptions. Since I have no access to data about the reviewers age, culinary experience, cultural background and priorities, the analysis of their perceptions cannot produce confident/meaningful recommendations to act. Hence, Yelp restaurant reviews are no longer a reference source for me.

Analysis of customer reviews of products published on Amazon and other sites like that can be very valuable to product and brand managers. They can find great insights for optimization of a product’s lifecycle, a brand’s product mix or advertising efficacy. However, the correlation between customer experience data and sales and returns’ data, will always produce much more confident calls to action.Customer Experience-From Data to Action 1 dashboard

The myth of “The One” has been propagated in our culture for a long time. That explains the popularity of books and movies that try to make us believe in a single source of wisdom, love and happiness, or whatever else they sell. Similarly, technology providers market their analytical tools for a single source of data as a “strategic” solution, but market intelligence is highly contextual and requires a multiplicity of sources to be meaningful.

Flashy dashboards, without blended data sources, cannot produce confident calls to action.  Blending different models to analyze the same data will likely increase the confidence even more. It is important to remember that the effectiveness of your efforts depends much more on the data sets you choose to analyze in concert, than on the tools you choose for analysis and visualization.

Not all social media channels are created equal

Not all social media channels are equalThe value of a company, brand or product’s reputation in the socially connected marketplace has started to eclipse the value of their paid advertisement and marketing efforts. If you need proof that the previous statement is true, please explore the bibliography list at the bottom.  In this post I would like to explore the state of the reputation ecosystem and hierarchy of its content from the perspective of the customers and the businesses involved.

The contemporary wisdom of social media marketing and customer support pundits, suggests that companies have to monitor any channel their customers are using at all times. In practical terms such an approach may result in ineffective use of monetary and talent resources. The extensive and growing selection of channels available to customers makes it improbable to monitor and mine content for producing meaningful action.  The same dilemma faces customers and businesses alike:

Which social media channel is the best to publish my customer experience to make a desirable impact?

Which social media channel is most likely to serve trustworthy content, to help me make the best purchase choice?

Which social media channel(s) are most likely to yield the most valuable insights at a reasonable cost?

If your idea of reputation management is chasing every negative mention of your brand anywhere on the Internet and trying to erase or neutralize it, you will spend a lot of time and money playing this “whack-a-mole” game without any financial gain. Your brand/reputation, is what your customers say about their experience doing business with your company. The best you can do is learn from what they say publically to improve their personal experience every step of their journey. In the age of social customers, manipulation and puffery do not work as well as they used to, yet authenticity and competence became the currency of choice.

From that perspective different social media channels, where customers can share their experiences, offer very different value for both consumers and the brands based on these criteria:

  1. Is there a sufficient volume of customer feedback on this channel? A small number of a product/brand customers, who share their experience on a given channel, makes this channel superfluous for assessing this product/brand reputation. It also makes it improbable for the brand to learn how to improve customers’ experience cross market.
  2. What is the business model behind the social media channel? Who pays for the channel to be in existence, and what is the primary reason for this channel’s existence? Based on the answers you can expect certain biases to influence the content published in the specific social media channels, regardless of their assurances. Facebook’s brand/product page is paid for by the brand to advertise its products, therefore the probability of finding negative customer comments published there is relatively low. The Amazon reviews site is published (paid for) by retailers to increase page visit to the purchase conversion ratio – not of the specific product page, but of any product page available on the Amazon website. Therefore the authenticity of content on a site like Amazon is more trustworthy than on a site like Facebook. The trustworthiness of many social media channels, like Yelp, Trustpilot, TravelAdvisor and others, has been challenged by both consumers and companies in the past. No allegations were actually proven, but their business model’s dependence on brand’s support/advertising leads to the suspicions of conflict of interest.
  3. What is the desired outcome? An enthusiastic Twitter message from somebody you barely know is not likely to help in selecting your next washing machine purchase. A reasonable number of BestBuy.com customer reviews, describing their experience in reasonable detail, may well assure you that this machine would treat your laundry they way you would expect it. It is not about positive and negative sentiments, it is about the relevance of published opinions to the desired outcome of the reader. The detailed description of an experience with a specific product helps consumers understand how the customers’ experience relates to their own expectations. From the perspective of a brand/product manager, the analysis of a Twitter stream can provide the knowledge that your customers in the West region love your brand, but the customers in South hate it, but it is not likely to help you measurably improve your brand reputation.

Every day and every technology bring new choices. The wise choices are the result of careful consideration of desired outcomes and prudent analysis of potential for unintended consequences.

 

Bibliography

  1. Absolute Value: What Really Influences Customers in the Age of (Nearly) Perfect Information
  2. http://www.eweek.com/small-business/social-media-seo-investment-rises-as-paid-advertising-falls.html
  3. http://blogs.sap.com/innovation/sales-marketing/loyalty-or-reputation-which-sells-your-product-better-01248327
  4. http://customerthink.com/customer-experience-is-more-important-than-advertising-infographic/
  5. http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/marketing_sales/a_new_way_to_measure_word-of-mouth_marketing

How to get (and keep) a customer-centric reputation

How to get CX reputationI admit to spending more time reading books, blogs and articles about customer experience, as well as analyzing customer feedback, than most people on the planet. As a result, my personal experiences  often fall short of my expectations dealing with companies unfortunate enough to have me as a customer. Even those companies that are most highly regarded as models of customer centricity by the customer experience management community often miss the mark.

I am well aware of the fact that my own experience could be just a momentary slip in customer experience delivery, and does not diminish a company reputation as a whole. On the other hand, I wonder how uncommon is my experience dealing with some of these high reputation companies. In other words, do companies that are known for their customer centricity deserve their reputation?

USAA tops every list of the most customer centric companies based on institutional surveys results and well orchestrated publicity of these results. The company’s own customer reviews site indicates that 91% of customers are satisfied enough to recommend their services. Yet, there are hundreds of others on the same site who are enraged about their experience with the company. If you look at the customer reviews and complains sites outside of the company’s control, the satisfaction numbers are much lower than the levels expected of the leader in customer centricity. In fact, they are only marginally higher than the satisfaction scores of their competitors. However, apparently it is good enough to keep USAA on top.  I understand that no company can satisfy every customer. I just want to illustrate that you don’t have to be the best to earn the top spot, you just have to be the best option available. Particularly, if you operate in regulated markets and your customers have to buy the products you sell (auto insurance).

Amazon is another poster child of customer centricity. This company competes in the markets where consumers have plenty of choice, unlike the previous example. Based on the ratio of customer praise and complains on the independent customer reviews sites, Amazon’s social reputation is much higher than most retailers. Bed, Bath and Beyond is the only other retail company that earned similar customer experience scores from non institutional sources. Analysis of the employees’ feedback available online, shows substantially more positive perception of the BBB than of Amazon’s. Yet, I’ve never seen Bed, Bath and Beyond mentioned as a positive example of a customer centric company.

So what helps a company to get a reputation that incites consumers to do business with them?

  • Passionate, visionary leaders committed to excellence in product design (Steve Jobs or Elon Musk) or customer experience (Jeff Bezos or Tony Hsieh);
  • Smart use of the customer satisfaction measurement industry (institutional) to get publicity;
  • Don’t suck more than your competitors.

How to keep this reputation? Here are a few suggestions

  1. Understand who are your best customers and why they choose to do business with you
  2. Recruit, evangelize and empower the best team to make your best customers happy
  3. Do not promise more than you are ready to deliver consistently across all steps of the customer journey
  4. Execute your business processes consistently and transparently

Every company should work hard to deliver better experience to its customers than it currently does …before competitors do. The major cause of company failure is company success.

 

More Signs of Decline in Brand Relevancy

Last week I was shopping for a new Bluetooth headset for my phone after my trusted Motorola  betrayed me in the middle of an important call with a client. It did not quite dropped dead, it just “ceased to be”, in the words of Monty Python parrot salesman, but a replacement was in order. That brought me to Amazon, searching for a set with the highest customer reviews rating.

Personally, I do not put a lot of trust into any product reputation ratings unless it has at least 50 authentic customer reviews. Lack of authenticity in paid reviews is pretty easy to spot. However, the higher the number of reviews provided by customers about their experience with a product, the more difficult for “idiot” marketers to manipulate the product’s reputation. The list of headsets that met these criteria was quite surprising since only 30% of these best rated products were from the brands that are expected to dominate this market segment – like Plantronics and Motorola. A skeptic would point out that high customer reviews’ ratings do not guarantee high volume of sales, however we have studied in the past the correlations between the number of reviews and the number of products sold. They suggest very strongly that high product reputation score, coupled with high number of customer reviews,  is predictive of strong sell through numbers for the product.

Use of these correlations for quick calculation reveal that :

  • LG, not a well known brand in the headsets market, sold an estimated 39% of total units
  • The best known brands sold only 31% of total units
  • Brands, I have never heard before, sold 30% of total units.

Can you recall any advertising that mention Kinivo or SoundBot in any context? I cannot. And yet, each one of these “un-brands” managed to outsell a premium brand like Motorola at very similar price levels. Together they outsold the former king of the segment (in terms of units sold) – the mighty Plantronics – by 7%. The Google search by their names finds very simple websites that list their products and a few retailers where you can find them. I could not find any fancy designs and mission statements commonly associated with the big brands marcom either.

This is not a new phenomena and it is not limited to any specific market segment. The authors of the book “Absolute Value” gave a number of examples where experiential information, provided by a product’ customers, propelled totally unknown “brands” to very significant sales numbers at the expense of well known and respected brands. There are also quantitative studies that help to understand the dynamics of brand value debasement by publicly available customer feedback.

Brands are falling

Certainly not every market segment is equally affected by this erosion. Specific market segment intelligence studies can quickly assess whether your brand is under attack and what are the monetary implications. Ongoing monitoring of the competitive landscape is commonly done by many brand and product managers, but most efforts are focused on basic sentiment analysis of a brand’s mentions found in social media, which is rarely insightful or actionable.

A highly disciplined approach to the management of data, containing unsolicited customer feedback, is required to produce meaningful sets for analysis. Deep analysis of such data sets, when focused on customer experience as oppose to features and functions, can help to understand patterns and dynamics of consumer perceptions. Such knowledge is imperative for competing in today’s markets because nobody is safe anymore to hide behind mighty brands of the past.

The “Agile” Approach to Consumer Product Marketing

When process succedsThe term Agile is most familiar to people involved with software development, but the basic concepts can be applied to consumer products successfully as well. At least two of its core principals – use of iterations and collaborative involvement of product users (i.e. customers) – were effectively practiced years before the term was introduced and became commonly accepted.

Wide acceptance of Agile methodologies arguably resulted in dramatic increases in software project’s ROI caused by:

  • reduction in the number of abandoned projects
  • cost reduction for user training and documentation
  • increase in user adoption of the “final” product

In other words, the application of Agile methodologies reduces the uncertainties of delivering an expected outcome.

Development of software to simplify business user’s jobs, has at least one critical similarity to the development of many consumer products – customers cannot clearly articulate their requirements. Particularly, the latent ones. Of course there are tools to help you do this, Kano analysis, being one of the most popular. Unfortunately, not enough consumer product marketing professionals are known to use these tools. That manifests itself in a very high failure rate of bringing consumer products to market. The actual rates of consumer product failure are quoted anywhere from 30% to 80%. The numbers vary by industry and are controversial because they do not clearly articulate what “failure” means. I define a product “failure” when it did not deliver the originally forecasted revenue.

Accenture research estimates that the CE (consumer electronics) industry alone has spent $16.7 billion a year to “receive, assess, repair, re-box, restock and resell returned merchandise.” More than two thirds of these costs, or $11.2 billion, are characterized as No Trouble Found (NTF). In other words, the products did not meet the customer’s expectations. Personally, I find the term NTF very disturbing – $11 billion waste caused by poor market requirement definitions and misleading advertising, is indeed a big trouble. That number does not include the cost of the customers time wasted, hit to the brand reputation and environmental costs of transporting and stuffing landfills with failed products and packaging.

The cause of the CE product NTF fail is relatively easy to diagnose – too many products are conceived by engineers who value the “cool” factor the most, without any reference to actual customer needs. That approach worked well while the price and advertising were the most critical factors in customers  purchase decisions. The last few years have seen a dramatic increase in the importance of customer experience delivery as the most influential factor in selecting a product.  The revenue growth of the leaders (Apple and Samsung) are cooling down, while the rest of the CE companies are seeing a drop in revenue and profit contraction.

Meanwhile, there is some evidence that small “un-brand manufacturers” are doing well by practicing “Agile” – looking methods to capture market share from the established brands.

  1. They “collaborate” with the customers of their competitors by analyzing product reviews they published online. They learn what caused these products to fall short of their customers’ expectations and why they purchased these products on the first place;
  2. They design products based on the results of that “collaboration” and their interpretation of consumer needs.
  3. They manufacture small lots of products to test the accuracy of their interpretation, market reaction and analysis of the feedback before going to the next “iteration”;
  4. They form customers’ expectations by “communicating” the product properties with the language used by customers to describe their experience.

“Agile” product marketing is a better approach when scale of design and manufacturing does not work anymore. It is not “cool” that sells your products today, it’s the experience your company delivers to the people who buy them.

 

In Defense of Anecdotal Evidence

During the last two decades traditional retail business has experienced a disruption similar to an earthquake delivered by the proliferation of ecommerce. That earthquake caused tsunami-like floods of online customer reviews describing personal experiences with specific products. Those retailers, who embraced this wave of untamed customer feedback, surfed it to higher “visit to conversion rates”, growth and profitability.   The way I feel isToday millions of customers share their experiences online about a wide variety of products and services, both personal and business related. Based on multiple studies, the trust other consumers give to these reviews is increasing from year to year.   While the flood of experiential information provided by customers and its influence continues to grow, many marketing researchers still question its value to business. To be fair, there were some interesting studies conducted that found correlations between the quantitative aspect (star rating) of customer reviews and the restaurants’ revenue. However, qualitative research of the actual reviews is being sneered upon and labeled “anecdotal”.

“The expression anecdotal evidence refers to evidence from anecdotes. Because of the small sample, there is a larger chance that it may be unreliable due to cherry-picked or otherwise non-representative samples of typical cases. Anecdotal evidence is considered dubious support of a claim; it is accepted only in lieu of more solid evidence. This is true regardless of the veracity of individual claims.”  The underscore is mine.

Interestingly, the above quote comes from Wikipedia, that itself has been attacked by status quo defenders as “inaccurate”. Yet, this quote is the best definition I could find online, after checking more “official” sources like Oxford and Merriam-Webster.   Since Customer Experience is a perception, there is no more meaningful evidence to communicate it than an anecdote. Based on the definition, two primary reasons for not using it to form strategic decisions are the size and quality of the samples in terms of representation. When it comes to customer reviews, the available volume (sample size) often exceeds the size of samples collected by most quantitative marketing research projects. Mining of these anecdotes produces very meaningful insights with a real business return on investment that quantitative methods are not capable to discover. Such techniques allow:

  • discovery of patterns and trends within the multitude of “anecdotes”,
  • measurement of their relative importance to customers,
  • measurement of the sentiments associated with these patterns.

The cross-sectional representation of these findings may subsequently be validated via traditional quantitative methods.   The internet democratized many aspects in our lives and not everyone likes it. The selection of sampling strategies for research used to be the prerogative of professional researchers, who often act like high priests of the illusive cross-sectional representation probability standards. In reality, very few of them actually practice any probability sampling methods beyond relatively basic demographics. The proliferation of inexpensive online survey tools enable people, without special training, to conduct marketing research. Most marketing executives, the recipients of this research, have neither the background to venerate these methods nor have experienced a measurable advantage using them. On the other hand, customer reviews often can be subjected to sampling based on gender, geography, age, time published, etc. to improve probability of more full representation of the customer base.   Those who continue to belittle a value of untamed customer feedback to business will fall victim of their own elitism and become even less relevant than they are now. Change before you have to.

3 Steps for Improving the Value of Voice of Customers

Every company collects customer feedback in one form or another. It is the ability to HEAR what their customers SAY that separates successful companies from “also run”s. Below are 3 steps that can help your company to improve its hearing:

  1. VOC value 1Stop manipulating it

 

The availability of inexpensive survey tools, that allow you to produce and send your questions to thousands of email addresses, does not translate into valuable knowledge of how your customers experience doing business with your company. The type of questions you ask, inevitably influence the type of answers you receive. Implement ation of a shiny new “customer engagement” software, does not translate into meaningful insights for improving your products and services. People’s motivations for choosing to engage and conditions of their engagement, inevitably corrupt a value of their input.

“Just because something isn’t a lie does not mean that it isn’t deceptive.” Criss Jami

Just because you have no intent to manipulate Voice of Customer does not mean your efforts produce trustworthy results. Focus on listening to what customers have to say on their own accord and without any guidance.

“It’s not at all hard to understand a person; it’s only hard to listen without bias.” Criss Jami 

 

2.  Stop being an order taker

 

It became fashionable to quote Henry Ford and Steve Jobs in arguing that VoC is not a source of innovation. I am not sure there is an VOC valueargument to be made – if customers were able to produce Market Requirements Documents, who would need innovators? It only means that if you expect customer feedback to spell out MRD for you, perhaps innovation is not your calling. The VoC is one of the best sources for learning the problems customers trying to resolve by “hiring” products available to them. Understanding of their problems and empathy with their experience, inspire true innovators to “translate” customer feedback into breakthrough products and services.

“The aim of selling is to satisfy a customer need; the aim of marketing is to figure out his need.” P. Kotler

 

  1.  Stop using selective hearing

 

Just because you pretend that VoC is limited to the customers who answer your questions, Word of Mouth does not stop influencing the rise or fall of your product’s fortunes. You can hide your head in the sand, but that will likely accelerate the distraction of your brand reputation. According to Jeff Besos, who knows a thing or two about customer-centricity:

“If you make customers unhappy in the physical world, they might each tell six friends. If you make customers unhappy on the Internet, they can each tell 6,000.”

You are more likely to learn from Word of Mouth analysis what really is important to your customers and why they buy your product, than from their responses to your survey.

Social Media Research of Customer Experience is a Smart Marketing investment

Dudley squatListening to customers through social media channels, is a well established practice for support of  Customer Service and PR business processes. Marketing organizations are less known for their successful attempts to use social media to engage customers. Many of these attempts were widely publicized as clumsy, some even caused an adverse reaction. This underscores how far marketing has parted from its original purpose – ‘The management process responsible for identifying, anticipating and satisfying customer requirements profitably.’ From that perspective, Customer Experience Management discipline belongs under the Marketing umbrella. Brands, that enjoy well above average growth and profitability, understand that customers don’t buy products or services – they buy experiences.

Marketing investments in social media can produce much better returns when they are focused on customer experience research. Instead, marketers try to use this technology in advertising mode, like traditional media channels. Below are just a few reasons that make Social Media Research of customer experience a better investment than traditional marketing research:

  1. Survey participants’ opinions are less valuable than the opinions of online customer reviews. Only personnel that conduct surveys are impacted by the participants’ opinions. In contrast, a very large number of prospective customers are directly influenced by a product’s online reviews. Shoppers, who are aggressively searching for social media recommendations, would not make a purchasing decision without reading the stories of customer experiences. The content of these stories is inherently more valuable for product marketing than satisfaction scores.

 

  1. The volume of a product’s customer reviews, and other social media mentions, is often substantially larger than a sample size of even a professionally conducted survey. This translates into better Confidence Interval/Margin of Error rates.

 

  1. A survey will tell you that your customers are really satisfied with their purchase and would likely recommend your brand to their friends, family members or colleagues. Whether they will or will not do it is shrouded in mystery. In contrast, over 64% of online review writers, share their recommendations with members of their social circles via Twitter, Facebook or Instagram. Actions speak much louder than words. Particularly when it comes to predicting consumer behavior.

 

  1.  Social Media Research allows one to easily benchmark customer experience metrics against competitive products. Such intelligence is very valuable for product management and planning professionals who commonly straggle to predict future demand, looking at 3 months old and static numbers instead of up to date trends.

 

In the words of Brian Solis, the author of “WTF-What’s the Future of Business” – The future of branding is experience architecture.